The massive Baby Boomer generation has reached retirement age, leaving the business world with a big challenge. As one generation leaves the workforce, a new one enters, bringing a fresh perspective and youthful enthusiasm.

Filling your company’s entry-level positions means attracting this next generation. Millennials, defined as those between the ages of 23 and 38, are unique from previous generations, but they’re also not all that different. Like Boomers, as well as members of Generation X, millennials want to feel as though their voice is being heard. Here are a few tips to help you set up a culture that both attracts and retains today’s younger workers.

Offer Flexible Work Options

No matter what generation a worker is from, each person has a unique personality. That means individual work preferences. Using TTI Success Insights’ D.I.S.C.: The Universal Language of Observable Behavior, leaders can begin to understand these diverse workstyles and begin to create a culture that accommodates each of them. A personality driven by Dominance works better with minimal management and noise, making a private workspace or work-from-home arrangement the best option. On the other hand, Influence-driven personalities prefer interaction with others. By letting workers choose their own work environment, at least part of the time, you’ll be more likely to avoid turnover and reach a broader talent pool.

Invest in Their Careers

Using D.I.S.C., you can also begin to understand how each employee is likely to fit within your organization. You can put what you learn toward helping them outline a career path within your company. Even if an employee doesn’t remain with you for 30 years, showing an interest in everyone’s career development benefits your business, as employees are more likely to give your company their all if they feel you’re invested in them. This is especially important for those driven by Steadiness, as they thrive on stability and knowing what to expect comforts them.

Give Them Purpose

Millennials aren’t driven solely by money. In fact, you’ll get far more out of them by appealing to their drive toward purpose. Use D.I.S.C. to identify the driving force for each millennial you interview or hire, then try to connect that force to what your organization does. A person whose primary driving force is Influence, for instance, is driven by a desire to connect with others. Your work undoubtedly affects others, so make sure these employees have a direct relationship to that part of what you do.

As you’re filling vacancies and building a winning team, millennials will likely be an important part of your recruiting efforts. With the right work culture, you’ll not only attract younger workers, but they’ll stay longer and recommend your business to others, as well.